Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Tyranny's Next Target: Cheerios


WCBSTV: "According to a letter from the FDA General Mills' advertising violates the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The agency said claims that Cheerios ingredients can lower cholesterol within a certain amount of time, all while providing cancer-fighting and heart-healthy benefits, essentially makes Cheerios "a drug" by their definition. And no drug in this country can be legally marketed without an approved new drug application.
...
The FDA gave General Mills 15 days to explain how it will correct the statements on Cheerios boxes."

I like Honey Bunches of Oats, but this is absurd. How can a breakfast cereal that has been sold for decades and decades be a drug?

When the state controls frivolous aspects of society, that's how. I can not blame Obama himself for this, only the years heaped upon the years of fascist bureaucracy toiling away to prove it's own importance.

6 comments:

Gino said...

seems whenever i look at a bowl of cherioooooos i'm reminded of how large the national debt will become under the new world order.

Solameanie said...

I think we should all go out and buy several boxes of Cheerios just to protest.

If you want to see what the government probably has in store for us in time, watch the film "Soylent Green" with Charlton Heston and Edward G. Robinson.

FAICA Soldier said...

Edwward G Robinson is such a good actor but he does find himself in some questionable films.

Palm boy said...

Gino, there will be plenty of 0's floating around in your bowl. Loi.

Sola, FAICA, did you ever see the movie idiocracy?

Gino said...

make mine the apple cinamon variety.

Solameanie said...

Robert, I haven't seen that one.

FAICA, In terms of Edward G. Robinson, he died in 1973. "Soylent Green" was his last film. Which films of his are questionable? Just curious. In general, I find older films a lot more palatable than what they have out there now in terms of objectionable material. But keep in mind, my general time period for films I enjoy is 1930-1955. The Robinson flicks I'm fondest of were made in the 30s and 40s.